Posts tagged “clouds

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Wordless Wednesday – 8/17/16


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Wordless Wednesday 4/6/16


Stragglers

I don’t know what’s wrong with  me that I just don’t finish processing stuff before posting. I’m a nut. These are from the Mt. Foss sunset session.

By now you know I have a fern habit and when I saw these I knew I had to try to work with them. I’m not 100% sold on this, but I was trying to work fast with the light that I had. I wanted them back-lit and I like the glowing aspect, but the sun isn’t in a great position. Moving though, gave me a lot of lens flare. It was too distracting, so I went with this offset sun instead. It’s handheld at ISO 500 and since I wanted those rays coming from the sun, it’s stopped down to f13. I wasn’t sure it would be enough, since this is a new lens, but I took a chance and it worked. In order to get those in your shots, that kind of star effect, you need to close the aperture down.

Can you see the real me?

Usually the most color in a sunset happens after the sun sinks down past the horizon. I learned the hard way that sometimes the color takes a while to develop. The old adage “don’t pack until it’s black” is right on. If you have to hike back to your car in the dark, do it. Bring a headlamp or a flashlight and stay until you can’t see. It’s the only way to make sure you get the most out of the sunset. In the field I used an 8-stop graduated neutral density filter. I still use them because I think it helps me control the light better in-camera. In processing this one, I did notch the saturation up a bit (I think 15 on the sliders) and the luminance on the green and yellow channels, too, just to highlight that spectacular new foliage. I think it gives some much-needed depth in the foreground.

White Mountain Sunset

Anyway…sorry for the extra post. Sometimes I’m like a runaway train.


I live in New England

If you didn’t know before, you know now –

Old Jaffrey Meetinghouse in the early morning sun


Daybreak

Here’s some early shots from the last week or so.  I don’t know w hat got into me.

Adams pond and the whole world lit up pink the other day, it was so peaceful and fresh.  I could smell the apples from the orchard nearby, too.

Adams Pond Sunrise

and less than an hour later it looked like this, the fog still hung around which was cool –

Adams Pond Peak Color

A slightly larger body of water the next morning –

Lake Massabesic - Tripping the Far Horizon

on the way home to coffee and breakfast from that last shot, I stopped in a cemetery just down the street because it was so darn beautiful.  The colors just popped big time!  I rested the camera on a granite wall and aimed back toward the road.

Peaceful Passing

Lots more in the hard drive and in my head, so stay tuned.


Desert Visitor – me!

To many people the word desert conjures up images of dunes, rippling sand, cactus and brutal temperatures.  While some of that might be true, many deserts are far from that.  Their lushness and color just might surprise you.  Even though I’ve never lived near one, I’ve always loved the desert.  High desert especially.  That’s one of the reasons I keep returning to the west.  The immensity of it just gets to me.  The ever-changing face of it.  Here are some of my favorite desert images from my recent trip to California.

First is a sunset taken just outside Bishop at the start of Silver Canyon.  Unfortunately no clouds came to play so I was very glad the earth brought its own colors.

Pastel Hills (Silver Canyon)

I just love this next one.  It’s the same sunset, but with the hill in shadow and the sun lighting up that terrifically fluffy plant.  I have no idea what it is, but I love it.  I think it’s the ribbon of trail leading up and out of the frame that makes it so magical for me.

Prestidigitation

Ok, so this next one isn’t so much desert as mountains, but in the Sierras they go together.  The colors in this are just amazing and again, made up for the lack of clouds.  I think this is my first ever shot of alpenglow – that pink glow of wonderfullness on the snowy peaks.

Alpenglow above the desert

Of course the desert is not all soft colors and gentle hills.  It’s mostly a harsh environment that takes willpower to survive in.  Except for the sunrise shot, the others were all taken with a pretty stiff wind blowing. So much so that my long exposures lack clarity because my lightweight, travel tripod wasn’t heavy enough.  That wind was nothing.  A few days later in Mono Basin we had steady wind in the 20 mph range with frequent gusts up to 50mph.  Unreal.  It made it very difficult to deal with and I worried that my camera would be clogged.  The grit flew everywhere!  Up my nose. In my eyes.  I swear it took 10 minutes to rinse my hair in the shower that night.  Mostly it was pumice from the volcanoes that created this whole valley.  It’s so light that it flies in wind.

Anyway, these next two shots are taken right near the Mono Craters.  It was one of the only times the harsh light actually worked in my favor.  The fire was recent; in the last couple of years and not a thing is growing yet.  Nothing.  Zip.  It was pretty creepy actually because other than the unrelenting wind, nothing moved or made a sound.  No birds.  That was the most noticeable. Compare it to the next shot where the desert has come back after a much earlier fire.

A Dead Heavy Day

The proximity of a big lake, mountains and desert makes for some extreme weather.  No doubt these clouds had something to do with the wind.  Aren’t they great?  Like the clouds that hid the alien ships in Independence Day.

It Came from the Skies

Not the most intimate of portraits. Believe me I felt my visitor status the whole time I was out there.  So overawed by it all I had very little time to really get to know it.  Besides that I had to balance my photography with our vacation and not drive my ever-patient husband crazy.  Only once during the whole trip did I feel my photo mania irritated him, so I dialed back and we were good.


Landscape Photography Light – Myths and Misunderstandings

How are a landscape photographer and a vampire alike?

Neither goes outside at noon.

Seriously, it makes you wonder doesn’t it?  Blood-sucking fiend and Fun-sucking fiend, both taking the joy right out of life.

I recently stopped following a landscape photographer’s blog because he just kept going on and on about only shooting at the crack of dawn.  You know what?  It’s pompous.  It makes me wonder if the guy is really any good.  Why can’t he get a terrific photo during the day, huh?  Why cantcha snooty landscape photographer guy?  You know what else?  It’s boring.  Every single photo looks the same as every single other photo.  Lots of pastel-colored snow scenes with blue shadows and a few fences, trees and churches.  Nice, but dull.  Technically well-executed, but a yawn fest.  I mean, if that’s all you do it’s pretty repetitive.  Plus you have to stay inside all day and where’s the fun in that?

Don’t misunderstand, I get the appeal of shooting when the sun is low, but I don’t get the strictness about it. It’s almost like religious dogma with some photographers.  I mean, hell, I’m out all day sometimes, does that mean I shouldn’t take pictures?  Baloney.

I.  Don’t. Buy. It.

Witness –

 

American Pastoral

I took that shot at about midday last spring.  No, it isn’t subtle and all soft and glowing with pastel shades, but it’s still a good photograph.  Sometimes photography means working with the light you have.  It’s knowing how that can help you make the most of what you find.  Using this same shot as an example, what did I do that helped?  I used a polarizing filter.  Knowing that color would be one of the things to make the shot work, I made sure I had the best of it in that reflection.

Ever hear the expression “perfect is the enemy of good”?  Well, that’s how I think of these other golden hour only photographers.  They sacrifice good images on the altar of perfect (or their ideas of perfect) and who knows if they ever please themselves.  Yes, there is such a thing as perfect light, but  it varies by subject matter and what kind of photograph you want.  I’d rather be flexible than rigid.  I’d rather know how to deal with “imperfect” light than only venture out twice a day.  With the vampires.

So what else.  Oh yeah, how about vacation.  For most of us it means going to a place we probably won’t go back to again.  Once in a lifetime kind of thing.  You have to work with what you find.  What if the sky doesn’t have nice, puffy clouds in it like that first photo?  What if the sky is boring and dull?  Well put something in it –

 

To Infinity...and Beyond!

Or find something in the foreground to take its place –

 

Down to the Waterline

Another one shot when the sun is high and guess what?  It doesn’t suck.  Who wants to drag their asses out of bed at dawn on vacation every day?  Not this little gray duck.  Once, maybe twice, but not every day.  Hell.  It’s vacation.

All right, what if the light itself is flat and dull?  Isolate.  Get out your telephoto, baby.  Sometimes tightening up on big vistas can give you little slices that are just as interesting.

Dimensional Sojourn

 

Water Under the Bridge

Another thing you can do is scout your location beforehand.  This can present you with ideas you can use when the light changes.  Take this example –

 

Frozen gorge at Smart's Brook

I shot this on my 2nd or 3rd trip to this location.  From past visits I knew how the light would track in the afternoon and because I’d seen it in the trees before, I knew that it would also light up the ice in the gorge.  Ta da!  It worked.  And it’s what makes this photo.  Not the subject – the LIGHT.  And it’s not sundown either.  By the time the sun sinks that low up there, the light is gone from this gorge.  Mr. Snooty Landscape Photographer would have missed this completely.

See…you don’t need to only photograph during the golden hours (roughly ½ hour before and after the sun rises or sets, also called civil twilight), but if you know how to manage the light you have, you can usually come up with something you’ll be happy with.  After a little practice you can make almost any scene work for you.  Good light is what you make of it.  Of course, getting there early is never a bad idea –

Dawn at Ponemah Bog


Black and White Photography 101

The other day someone asked what made a good black and white photograph.  He went on to say that he only uses black and white processing when he’s trying to achieve an old photo look, but noticed when someone converted one of his color images to black and white it looked better because the distracting color of an object was eliminated.  While both might be good reasons for sometimes converting to monochrome, I find the approach puzzling.  Why use monochrome to “save” a picture only?  Or to fake a vintage look?  Then I thought about it a little more and wondered if this kind of thing happens because people new to photography have never shot film.  My initial conclusion was borne out in a limited way by conversations I had with two photography buddies.  One has a good eye and often produces excellent images, but only has digital camera experience where every image starts in color.  My other friend on the other hand shot a lot of Tri-X in the past and we agreed that if you do this enough, you can get a feel for the gray value of color.

But it’s not the grays that make a monochrome image sing – it’s the blacks and whites.  You’ve got to have both extremes to make it work.  Even if you clip a little in the highs and lows, it’s better than having a dull, lifeless image swimming in gray.  Depending on the mood you want to strike, lots of contrast can work to make an image sing as well.  Don’t get carried away, but don’t be afraid to play with those sliders.

You can’t do all your work in post processing though.  You’ve got to put the camera to your eye and envision things in black and white.  Because there will be no color to catch or lead the eye, you must be especially careful about compositional elements and the forms and structures you’re photographing.  A black and white image has to be even stronger in composition and framing than a color photograph.  If it’s weak in color, it will be doubly so in monochrome.  Remember that the eye instinctively looks towards white and light shades first.  We also react very well to strong shapes defined by dark and light areas.

One exercise that may help you is to set your camera to record black and white jpegs.  You can have it give you raw files, too, if you want color renditions.  But if you really want to figure out what works and what doesn’t in black and white, set your camera to monochrome (most DSLRs and many high-end compacts have this mode, you just need to find it).  You will still see in color through the viewfinder, but live view will be in black and white.  Look at the differences.  How differently does your eye follow through the image in color versus B&W?  Are your forms strong enough?  Can your subject be recognized (identified) without color?  Are the gray values of the colors too close and without definition?   Are you working with strong leading lines?  Do you see pure white and black?  It shouldn’t take you long to get the hang of it.

Once you’ve got your images on your computer, process them in the normal way, adding contrast, sharpness and cropping if needed.  You can further enhance your images with white balance, color sliders in B&W mode and curves.  If you can add grain, play with it.  Tri-X film had some beautiful grain back before they changed it to T-Max and we loved using that as part of the mood of our images.

Oh and one more thing – don’t be afraid to take chances with black and white.  Go for the unconventional.  Do a black and white rainbow picture.  Try a sunset in black and white.  How about a flower?  The beach?  If your subject is strong in terms of form and you’ve nailed the composition, there’s almost no reason a B&W image can’t be as strong as a color image.  Identify what’s interesting your subject – is it shape?  Texture?  Light and shadow?  Framing?  Mood?  Use black and white to enhance those things that might be overwhelmed by color.

Compare the images in this collage and see how different the mood is from color to B&W.

Here are a few more images that I think work particularly well in B&W.  All were shot in color since I work from raw files, but each was done with a final B&W image in mind.  Some were done this way because there was little color in the scene, some because the forms, lines, shapes or shadows made me go hey – I don’t need color for this one.  They are all from my Black and White Gallery.

Symptom of the Universe

Winter Sunrise

The Promise

So to recap –

1.   Set your camera to monochrome jpeg mode

2.   Use live view to ‘see’ in black and white

3.   Check for strong compositions and recognizable subjects

4.   Make sure you have pure white and black in your picture

5.   Take chances and have fun

 

Check out Black and White Photography 201


Dam the Poor River

On the way home from an appointment I took a rather long detour which brought me by the Hopkinton-Everett Dam.  It was built in the early 60s as part of a flood control measure.  In 1938 there was a powerful hurricane that caused immense damage and destruction.  The Piscataquog, like other rivers, overflowed its banks and raged unchecked for days.  It’s one of the most picturesque rivers in  NH and important part of the Merrimack river basin.

Anyway, I got there after the peak color, but the golden glow is still pretty spectacular in the afternoon sun.

Sentinel - dam tower in the landscape

Lookout

The Everett lake is a popular spot in the summer for swimming and boating. I hunted around on the shore to find just the right foreground framing elements and really like the results, especially the white of the birch trunks –

Golden glow

I walked up top in the bright sun and couldn’t help a few perspective shots –

The Approach

The Tower

As you can see, the tower platform is guarded with chain link fence, but more importantly it is guarded by swarms of hornets that made me so mental that I got out of there fast.  I guess the unusually warm day and bright sun had them active, but with so few flowers or whatever they had nothing to do except buzz around in little swarms and terrorize me.  They were even on the railings and flying between the slats.  Ick.  I made my escape.

Ceremony of Opposites

I didn’t exactly run, but I was really glad to be away from the bored, buzzing, kamikaze hornets.


How Do I Love Thee October

Let me count the ways –

 

Gilson Pond reflecting

Gilson pond reflecting

Colors of the marsh at Pulpit Rock

More colors of the marsh at Pulpit Rock

Ascending into gold at Bear Brook State Park

The fallen at Bear Brook State Park

Wildflowers in autumn at Bear Brook State Park

The Jungle Underfoot at Bear Brook State Park

It’s been truly wonderful this season.  More to come.